Monday, December 14, 2009

Why Choose Heritage Breeds?

There's a fantastic post by The Ethical Butcher on why choosing Heritage Breeds is crucial to developing sustainable meat production. 

From the article:

Every farm that is raising and selling heritage meats is one more that IS NOT a disgusting feedlot. As I stated earlier, the needs of these breeds make factory farming a non-option. They basically demand a farmer to revert to old methods, seasonality and bio-diversity. All of this requires respect, attentiveness and a connection to the earth and its cycles from the farmer. By raising far fewer animals, the problem of pollution from the waste products are greatly reduced. A natural diet lessens pressure to produce the corn and soy used in commercial feed, and therefore also lessens the amount of fossil fuels needed to transport these foods. All that waste only results in diseased animals.* Because heritage breeds eat good food, are given space to live their lives the way nature intended, and allowed to form familial bonds and have farmers deeply committed to their health, I can only imagine these animals are much happier than their industrial counterparts. At this point, most heritage breeds are raised on very small farms and so often become local products by default. Supporting these local farms bolsters local economies. It's like killing 10 birds with one stone. On a purely visceral level, it is not even worth comparing the flavor and texture of heritage breed meat to that of industrial breeds.

9 comments:

A&W said...

So where do we find Heritage Breed meats for sale? I really just need someone to very clearly state where to go to buy this stuff. I want to do the right thing but I feel like it is just impossible to find the actual product without having to order meat online. Is there a butcher around here? A farm? Where do I go? That local harvest website just lists a couple of farmers markets... not helpful.

valereee said...

A&P, you can find heritage pork from Tom Cail -- he's in the database at the Cincinnati Local Foods Group (link at the top of the page on the left) and heritage poultry at Johnson Farms (same database). To look for other heritage breeds, post at the group and ask.

Anonymous said...

Brim over I to but I contemplate the list inform should prepare more info then it has.

Kristin said...

Following up on the first comment: I want to buy meat that doesn't come from CAFOs, but how do I know? For example, Where do the butchers at Findlay Market get their meats/poultry? Is it different for each one, or are there certain standards across the board for them?

Anonymous said...

Keep posting stuff like this i really like it

V said...

related article in NYT this week re: heritage breed preservation.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/06/dining/06frozen.html?hpw

valereee said...

Kristin, your best bet is to ask them where their meat comes from. It's definitely different for each one. I like to buy directly from the farmer when I can -- often this means buying in bulk, which is also much cheaper, but does require freezer space!

coxfamilyfarms said...

Cox Family Farms can help! We are local family farmers with grass-fed, heritage breed beef. Our cows roam freely on wild grown pasture and drink from a spring fed pond. Our cows are never shipped and are processed locally. You can check us out on facebook (Cox Family Farms) or shoot us an email at coxfamilyfarms@gmail.com. We are now taking reservations for shares of a beef (half, quarter or whole) for March/April.

valereee said...

Cox Family Farms, thanks for posting! Are you guys on the Cincinnati Local Foods Group list? It's at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cincilocavore, if you're interested. There are about 1000 members, all of whom are interested in finding locally-grown and produced foods.